THAT’S IT. I’VE GONE MIRRORLESS! PART 1

I did it — I went mirrorless this week when I bought the new Canon EOS R Mirrorless body and I’m super-psyched. I mentioned this on “The Grid” this week and I had a flood of questions, so I thought today I answer some of the most common questions I’ve been getting about the switch. Here goes:

Q. Why did you wait so long?

A. Mostly because of all the rumors about Canon coming out with a pro-level mirrorless camera later this year, but my fear is the pro-level one when it comes out, will be more than I need (more megapixels, a lot more money, heavier, etc.). Plus, I have my Paris Workshop coming up next month, and while I could rent one from LensProToGo.com, I already know I really like the EOS R, and when I saw a great deal on it on B&H Photo, I finally pulled the plug and bought it.

Q. I thought you already had a EOS R?

A. That was just a loaner from Canon. They let me try one for 60-days when it first came out. I’ll say this. It worked — I wound up buying one. I also borrowed one from CPS (Canon Professional Services) for my Aircraft Carrier Trip last month. On that trip, I fell in love with it all over again.

Above: That’s the Control Ring Mount which lets me use my existing Canon 16-35mm f/4 lens, and I assign that rotating ring on the adapter to control my Exposure Compensation.

Q. What does it do that your Canon 5D Mark IV doesn’t do?

A. It actually takes almost an identical image, since I believe it uses an updated version of the 5D Mark IV sensor, but it has so many things that my 5D Mark IV doesn’t, like a fully articulating pop-out rear LCD touch screen. I shoot a lot down low for my style of shooting (often on a Platypod), so being able to move that screen anywhere I want was a very big thing for me (that LCD screen is a higher resolution than my 5D Mark IV’s screen, too). There are a half-dozen other things that the EOS R does, that my 5D Mark IV doesn’t (stuff like the new Eye-AF feature, 4K screen grab, an assignable touchbar, fully silent shooting modes, built-in Bluetooth, way more autofocus points, double the RAW buffer, better auto-focus in low light), and those are all more icing on the cake for me. So, my images will look about the same, but it will be a better shooting experience for me and that’s really important to me.

Q. OK, give me one more thing.

A. That’s not a question (it’s more of a bossy order), but I do a lot of long exposures, and it has a really nice feature where you use its touch screen to take the shot (no cable release necessary) and then it times your long exposure for you on the big LCD screen [with big easy-to-read numerals). Well, there’s that and it’s just easier to do long exposures on a mirrorless camera. Of course, that applies to any mirrorless, but together it’s another plus. I know you only asked for one, but one thing I love is when you turn off the camera to change lenses; a little door comes down over the sensor opening, so junk doesn’t get on your sensor. I super dig that.

Q . So, does your 5D Mark IV now become your backup camera?

A. Yup, pretty much. I sold my old 5D Mark III (which was my backup camera) and my old 16-35mm f/2.8 lens on eBay and those pretty much paid for my upgrade. Now my 5D Mark IV will be my backup camera in most cases, but I could still see me using it for studio work. I’m not sure how I feel about an Electronic Viewfinder in the studio — I’ve done it, but not enough to make a final call.

Q. Does it tether to Lightroom Classic yet?

A. It does, but only for the past few days. Tuesday’s Lightroom Classic update included the ability to tether the EOS R into Lightroom. Whew! Just in the nick of time.

Q. I always thought Canon sent you all your cameras for free?

A. I hear that a lot (saw some comments that said that same thing on The Grid this past Wed). Unfortunately for me, they do not. I have to buy them, but again, B&H Photo had it for $300 off, so I bit (thanks B&H). Really glad I did.

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